Memo to Donald Trump: This is not 1968

donald-trump
That Donald Trump may believe we are living through another 1968 says less about the nation today and more about a man who may be our president. He admits to getting his news on cable, which creates a virtual 1968 with its constant images of unrest, violence, terrorism, and crime. But a virtual 1968 is not a real one, and we must expect any leader of our country to resist the emotional pull of gruesome television images and to think rationally and deliberately about the real state of our nation.

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We Mourn Muhammad Ali — And Something Even Bigger

Muhammad_Ali_1966Ali-Frazier. It was an event everybody in America paid attention to. In our fragmented media environment today that wouldn’t happen. That’s unfortunate.
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War, Liberalism, Trust in Government: The Many Casualties of LBJ’s Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

Johnson Fifty years ago, on August 10, 1964, President Lyndon Johnson signed what is known as the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. It is a day that should live in infamy.

On that day, the President gave himself the power “to take all necessary steps, including the use of armed forces,” to fight the spread of communism in Southeast Asia and assist our ally in South Vietnam “in defense of its freedom.”

Or as former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara put it decades later, it gave “complete authority to the president to take the nation to war.” Continue reading War, Liberalism, Trust in Government: The Many Casualties of LBJ’s Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

Boomer Suicides & The Washington Post: A Flawed Generational Narrative

Washington Post “How did a generation that started out with so much going for it end up so despondent in midlife?”

So asks the Washington Post in its recent front page story, “Why the sharp rise in suicides by boomers?”

The Post supports its claim by drawing on a report from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), which shows that the suicide rate for many boomers in 2010 was significantly higher than it was for people the same age eleven years earlier. Most compelling, writes the Post, is that the 2010 suicide rate for men in their 50s was “nearly 50 percent” higher than that of men who were in their 50s in 1999, rising from about 20 to 30 per 100,000.

Needless to say, headlines, chatter, and conversations followed, all gelling into an emerging conventional wisdom that this alleged spoiled generation just can’t hack growing older.

The problem: as with so much journalism about baby boomers, it’s not only misleading but built on a flaccid foundation of inaccurate history, bubblegum sociology, and generational stereotyping.

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