Fidel and the Americano

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I was 11 years old when I read the New York Daily News account of William Alexander Morgan’s execution. Morgan was an American adventurer who had gone to Cuba in 1958 to join the fight against Fulgencio Batista. A brave and resourceful soldier, he became a comandante in Castro’s army—the only foreigner to attain that rank apart from Che Guevara. Yet, just three years after he arrived, Castro denounced him as a traitor and ordered him shot.

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Our Moment in Cuba?

Last month I had the privilege of joining a study tour to Cuba with former members of Congress — sponsored by the U.S. Association of Former Members of Congress (FMC). We met with government and Communist Party officials, members of the National Assembly and Foreign Ministry, artists, scholars, academics, economists, entrepreneurs, even cigar workers. Cubans feel genuine optimism that the recent normalization of relations with the United States may usher in a new era of cooperation. Continue reading Our Moment in Cuba?

Revenge of the Clowns

Radio_Martí_broadcast_studioThe Cuban government’s resentment of Caballero’s employer is understandable, if a bit huffy.  After 30 years of beaming anti-Castro broadcasts toward “La Isla” (Cuba), U.S. Government-funded Radio and TV Martí has a pretty pathetic record.  Created in 1985 as an alternative news source for beleaguered Cubans, Martí never reached more than two per cent of the Cuban people, and 90 per cent of Cubans never even knew it existed.  Effective jamming by the Cuban government scrambled the signal almost all the time, even and especially during the brave days of broadcasting from a blimp over the Caribbean. Continue reading Revenge of the Clowns

A Speech For Sen. Ted Cruz

tedcThank you.  It is an honor to join you tonight.

First, a message for the media.  Yes, I am running.  I’m going to hit the hotel treadmill around 7 a.m. tomorrow.  Right after I watch Duck Dynasty. Continue reading A Speech For Sen. Ted Cruz